The Bahm Family from North East is inspiring people in the Erie area to participate in the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s Take Steps Walk on June 27, 2010 at Presque Isle State Park.

The family’s oldest daughter, Maggie, lives with Crohn’s disease which, combined with ulcerative colitis, are painful and unpredictable digestive disease impacting over 1.4 American adults and children including 28,000 in the Western Pennsylvania / West Virginia region.

Wendy, Maggie’s mom, said, “The great thing about the Take Steps walk is that it really encompasses everything that the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation is about. The walk raises awareness for digestive diseases by drawing large crowds and creating curiosity from on-lookers.  The walk raises necessary funds for research, educational programs, and the Foundation’s camp for kids- Camp Oasis,”

She continued, “The walk gives those suffering a sense of community a sense of support that they may not have in their daily life.  It also provides them with an opportunity to meet others who suffer from the same condition.  Take Steps is a reason to celebrate that despite suffering from these diseases, you can be out walking and making a difference for yourself and others. It has created for our family a team that supports Maggie in the difficult times and celebrates in the good times.  Take Steps Walk is a necessary and vital part of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation mission.”

The Bahm family, who has consistently been the walk’s top fundraisers, have been given all the necessary fundraising tools to raise critical research dollars for these diseases, including a free customizable Web page for fundraising support, fundraising advice and assistance, and banners for social networking sites like Facebook.

Those interested in learning more about the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation and Take Steps are invited to attend an Open House event on Friday, April 16 at Jr’s on the Bay from 6 – 8 p.m.

 For more information about becoming involved in Take Steps for Crohn’s & Colitis, visit www.cctakesteps.org or contact Jamie Rhoades at 412.823.8272 or jrhoades@ccfa.org.

About Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are painful, medically incurable illnesses that attack the digestive system. Crohn’s disease may attack anywhere from the mouth to the anus, while ulcerative colitis inflames only the large intestine (colon). Symptoms may include abdominal pain, persistent diarrhea, rectal bleeding, fever and weight loss. Many patients require hospitalization and surgery.  These illnesses can cause severe complications, including colon cancer in patients with long-term disease. Some 1.4 million American adults and children suffer from Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, with as many as 150,000 under the age of 18.  Most people develop the diseases between the ages of 15 and 35.

About the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America
The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s mission is to cure Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of children and adults affected by these diseases. The Foundation ranks third among leading health non-profits in the percentage of expense devoted to research toward a cure, and more than 80 cents of every dollar the Foundation spends goes to mission-critical programs. The Foundation consistently meets the standards of organizations that monitor charities, including the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance (give.org) and the American Institute of Philanthropy (charitywatch.org). For more information, contact the Foundation at 800-932-2423 or visit www.ccfa.org.

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